HOW TO REMOVE A TICK

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THINGS NOT TO DO

  • DO NOT twist, poke, squash, or burn the tick
  • DO NOT smother the tick with any substance

1. Take pair of pointy           tweezers

2. Place ends of tweezers at the base of the head

3. Apply steady, gentle pressure while pulling the tick up

4. Continue pulling until tick releases

COMMON RASH

40% OF PEOPLE WHO CONTRACT LYME DISEASE EXPERIENCE NO RASH AT ALL. THE MOST COMMON RASH TAKES THE FORM OF A "BULLS-EYE", BUT THERE ARE MANY DIFFERENT TYPES OF RASHES ASSOCIATED WITH LYME DISEASE.

Co-Infections

One tick may carry more than one disease, sometimes people get more than one infection from the bite of a single tick. The symptoms of these co-infections are often non-specific - such as fever and headache - which makes diagnosis difficult. The treatments may be different. Doxycycline, for example, works for Lyme Disease and Ehrlichiosis, but is not effective for Babesiosis. 

Experienced doctors may be able to distinguish each of the tick-borne co-infections and order appropriate tests and treatment. Sometimes they start to suspect a co-infection when the patient doesn't respond well to treatment and it becomes obvious that something else is causing the symptoms. Co-infections generally result in more severe illness, more symptoms, and a longer recovery. 

Ticks in different geographic areas may be infected with one or more of the following: COLORADO TICK FEVER VIRUS; MYCOPLASMAS; POWASSAN ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS; Q FEVER; ROCKY MOUNTAIN SPOTTED FEVER (Rickettsia); TICKBORNE RELAPSING FEVER BORRELIA; TULAREMIA (bacteria); BABESIOSIS; BARTONELLA

CO-INFECTIONS & OTHER DISEASES

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